Across the world we're approving planting sites with farmers to capture carbon in their soils and repair our planet. These are just some of the next planting sites we have listed while others are being vetted and approved.
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Selah Springs Ranch

Selah Springs Ranch

United States
My name is Phil Chavanne and along with my wife and daughters we manage Selah Springs Ranch, an adventure retreat ranch in the Texas Hill Country. This ranch has been in our family for 26 years and it is our goal to pass it down healthier with each generation. Our vision for the property is to steward the land by establishing grasslands in previously barren soils, to greatly increase the biodiversity of the land by establishing all 66 native tree species on the ranch as well as over 25 different grass species which will in turn sequester carbon, decrease erosion, recharge our aquifers and therefore our springs, all the while providing us with the opportunity to educate our guests on the importance of conservation.

This project is important to us because it would help us fulfill so many of our goals for a healthy land ethic on this ranch. Firstly it would greatly multiple the biodiversity of the land, radically transforming the future of the plant communities on the property. This would in turn attract a vast array of wildlife to the property who use these plant communities for food, nesting, and shelter. This project would also help reduce erosion of our precious soils as well as significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the property. And lastly, because this is a guest ranch that welcomes thousands of visitors a year, it would create a wonderful opportunity to educate the public on the importance of carbon sequestration, biodiversity, and an overall commitment to land ethic. We are thrilled by the possibility of such a project and grateful that such an opportunity exists.

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The Blue Horn Farm

The Blue Horn Farm

United States
We acquired a conventional cattle farm which we are transitioning to regenerative/re-wilding. We are first gen farmers focused on biodiversity and saving endangered heritage breed animals while using those animals skills to revitalize the soil. We also have a large airbnb where we love hosting guests and teaching them about regenerative ag.

The land was originally forest but was cleared for cattle. We are excited to plant trees and bring silvo pasture back to the land.
Our goal is to become Savory Institute Hub certified for proven carbon draw-down.

Its very important to us to leave the land better than we found it to provide future food, nutrition, shelter, etc for those who come after us. It is our goal not only to improve our little slice of heaven but continue to better many other areas around us.

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CLANCY'S ON CLARENDON

CLANCY'S ON CLARENDON

Australia
I am Matt, and with my wife Kristy along with our two young boys Oscar and Walt, moved to our farm in August 2020. It has been used for grazing and cropping over the years, and is surrounded by conventionally managed crop farms. The land is devoid of trees, and the soil is compacted and there is a lot of bare ground from being overgrazed. I have have been on a steep learning curve, in terms of regeneration agriculture, and the time has come for action, with our main focus being on increasing the soil organic content from 1% to 4% over the next 10 years. We intend to do this by using many Regen Ag techniques starting with subsoiling, and planting trees on contour lines throughout the entire property. Then introducing cattle, sheep and chickens, holistically managed in an attempt to encourage bio diversity of perennial grasses, and increase soil biology along with improved water and mineral cycles. Our area receives around 800mm of rainfall per year, and our aim is to hold onto this rainfall in the soil and plants as long as possible, mitigating the effects of drought. In doing this, we wish to produce nutrient dense food for our family first, then locally as we progress. All the while having our two young boys grow up in an environment conducive to positive world climate change, with the hands on knowledge to make positive changes to the environment through land stewardship.

They say the best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago, and the next best time is right now. Trees are key to sequestering carbon, and are a major part of the water cycle, and that is what the land is missing. It is utterly important to me to get trees in the ground, and to care for them so as to get this process going again, and provide habitat for native fauna. It terms of my farm, they will provide shade, and wind breaks, as I move livestock around and between them on pockets of pasture between tree stands on contour lines.

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Temple Farm

Temple Farm

Australia
Temple Farm is a Certified Organic operation in the western wheatbelt of Western Australia Great Southern Region that wholly integrates ecological values of revegetation establishment, remnant protection, landscape hydration, soil health and attunement. The property seeks to be a demonstration of pathfinding to configure future farm systems that are responsible towards meeting net zero emission goals, ethical production and climate ready. The property is ~1000ha and under the current 4th generation land manager stewardship aspirations has revegetated ~ 15% of the former cleared and unstable landscape back to native species for habitat and income diversity [including carbon farming and resourcing emerging bio economy prospects - renewable fuels, energy and plastics]. In addition the property has extensive remnant vegetation associations and riparian wetlands which are managed to enhance ecological permanence and functionality values.
In total we estimate in excess of 500,000 trees either planted and or encourage to repopulate on former cleared agland and through out existing bushland areas because of our management ethos...and still counting.

No task is complete. The property is a leading example of ecofarming and the owner wishes to lift the bar further with integration of native species that diversify current plantings and bring multiple values into farm systems, especially those culturally and botanically associated with first nation people's use for medicine, food and climate resilience. 'Re- indigenising' our thinking and relationship with attunement to country is a sure pathway to discovery of place and purpose.

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Sunnyside

Sunnyside

Australia
The Mcdonald Family Farm has been in my family for over 150 years. My Great Grandfather Alexander, acquired the land in the form of ‘Settlers Block’ in the 1850’s whilst he was working as a Head Stockman for a local landowners. Once he acquired the land, he continued to work for local landowners, work his land and rear 12 children. All the 12 family members lived and worked on the land throughout following years and once married, moved onto owning their own piece of paradise, except for the youngest of the 12 siblings, Donald.
Born in 1894, my Grandfather Donald was the youngest of the 12 siblings. After returning home from his service in the Light Horse Brigade, and realizing that his mother could not run the family farm on her own, he decided to stay and run the farm forfeiting his dream of becoming a Police Officer.

Donald eventually took over the land, married and had 2 sons both of whom grew up on the farm. The 2 brother Doug and Noel eventually took over the farm to run together as family concern. Doug and Noel both married , and Doug was the only brother to have children. Doug’s children were raised on the family farm. Now, the youngest of his two children continues to live and work the family farm with her children and grandchildren to be the next inline to be the future caretaker of the property.

We feel the Tree Planting Project is an opportunity to regenerate some of our land effected by drought, flood and land erosion. Our choice in trees was influenced by the natural vegetation that currently exist on the land to extend the Koala corridor in the area, attracting native bees, and to eventually provide shade and feed for stock. The trees will also stabilize soil, minimizing erosion into an adjacent natural waterway, improve the pasture and help to restore the environment for wildlife.